Prof. Kollanoor Riji John

Prof. Kollanoor Riji John

Prof. Kollanoor Riji John
Tamil Nadu Fisheries University

Prof. Kollanoor Riji John has a PhD in Fish Virology from University of Stirling under the Commonwealth Scholarship and a postdoctoral assignment in Fish Biotechnology in the University of Maryland on reverse genetics. Currently working as Chair, School of Aquaculture of the Tamil Nadu Fisheries University, he has been actively involved in teaching, research and extension for the past 25 years. He was responsible for the development and establishment of 12 new fish cell lines from freshwater and marine fishes and isolation and characterization a nodavirus and two ranaviruses from infected fishes. He has been involved in projects with funding support of over Rs.1120 lakhs, including International and National collaborative projects. His work included genotyping of WSSV and genomic and pathogenicity variations in WSSV due to host passaging. His team has developed a low cost technology for development of an herbal feed for tiger shrimps for resistance from WSSV. He has served in different National and international bodies as Member of the Task Force Committee of the Department of Biotechnology, Govt. of India; President, Professional Fisheries Graduates Forum; Member of the Expert Group, Ministry of Agriculture, GOI; Observer, Executive Committee of the Fish Health Section, Asian Fisheries Society; Section Editor, Virus Disease journal and in different University Committees. He has national and international publications to his credit and has attended over 60 national and international conferences. He has won Best Teacher and Best Researcher awards, travel grants for international conferences and best paper awards.

In the current project the aim is to database the various disease conditions in the shrimp farming system in terms of histopathology and molecular diagnostics and to analyse the metagenomics of the shrimp farming systems in the east coast of India including pond water, soil, animal and alternate hosts. The study carried out in different pond conditions including those under probiotics application would provide predictable variations that prelude incidence of disease in a shrimp farming system. Once backed up with sufficient data from different pond conditions, the results would form background information that could be used for developing into a model to predict the impending disease occurrence for the benefit of small scale farmers.